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A nova remnant is made up of the material either left behind by a sudden explosive fusion eruption by classical novae, or from multiple ejections by recurrent novae. Over their short lifetimes, nova shells show expansion velocities of around 1000 km/s,[1] whose faint nebulosities are usually illuminated by their progenitor stars via light echos as observed with the spherical shell[1] of Nova Persei 1901[2] or the energies remaining in the expanding bubbles like T Pyxidis.[3]

Gallery

GK Persei: Nova of 1901 – remnant

Nova T Pyxidis – remnant

Form

Most novae require a close binary system, with a white dwarf and a main sequence, sub-giant, or red giant star, or the merging of two red dwarfs, so probably all nova remnants must be associated with binaries.[4] This theoretically means these nebula shapes might be affected by their central progenitor stars and the amount of matter ejected by novae.[1] The shapes of these nova nebulae are of much interest to modern astrophysicists.[1][4]

Nova remnants when compared to supernova remnants or planetary nebulae generate much less both in energy and mass. They can be observed for perhaps a few centuries.[1] Notably, more nova remnants have been found with the new novae, due to improved imaging technology like CCD and at other wavelengths. Examples of novae displaying nebula shells or remnants include the following:[1]

GK Per
RR Pic
DQ Her
FH Ser
V476 Cyg
V1974 Cyg
HR Del
V1500 Cyg

See also

Planetary nebula
Supernova remnant

References

Lloyd, H.M.; O'Brien, T.J.; Bode, M.F. (1997). "Shaping of nova remnants by binary motion" (PDF). Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 284 (1): 137–147. Bibcode:1997MNRAS.284..137L. doi:10.1093/mnras/284.1.137.
Liimets, T.; Corradi, R.L.M.; Santander-García, M.; Villaver, E.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Verro, K.; Kolka, I. (2014). A dynamical study of the nova remnant of GK Persei / stella novae: Past and future decades. Stellar Novae: Past and Future Decades. ASP Conference Series. 490. pp. 109–115.arXiv:1310.4488. Bibcode:2014ASPC..490..109L.
Ogley, R. N.; Chaty, S.; Crocker, M.; Eyres, S. P. S.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Richards, A. M. S.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Stirling, A. M. (April 2002). "A search for radio emission from Galactic supersoft X-ray sources". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 330 (4): 772–777.arXiv:astro-ph/0111120. Bibcode:2002MNRAS.330..772O. doi:10.1046/j.1365-8711.2002.05130.x. Archived from the original on 5 January 2013.

Bode, M.F. (2002). The Evolution of Nova Remnants. International Conference on Classical Nova Explosions. AIP Conference Proceedings. 637. pp. 497–508.arXiv:astro-ph/0211437. Bibcode:2002AIPC..637..497B. doi:10.1063/1.1518252.

External links

"T Pyxidis". Hubble Site. Nova Remnant. 1997.
"Double-star systems cycle between big and small blasts". The Carnegie Observatories. Archived from the original on 8 August 2008.
"Nova Remnant comparison table". U. Ottawa. Archived from the original on 5 July 2006.
"Nova Remnant". U. Ottawa. Archived from the original on 5 July 2006.

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Nebula
Visible nebula

Dark nebula Diffuse nebula
Emission nebula
Planetary nebula Supernova remnant Nova remnant H II region Reflection nebula
Variable nebula Preplanetary nebula

Pre-stellar nebula

Giant molecular cloud Bok globule Evaporating gaseous globule Solar nebula

Stellar nebula

Nova remnant Protoplanetary nebula Wolf–Rayet nebula

Post-stellar nebula

Planetary nebula Supernova remnant Pulsar wind nebula Supershell

Clouds

Interstellar cloud
Molecular cloud Infrared cirrus High-velocity cloud H I region

Morphology

Bipolar nebula Pinwheel nebula

List-Class article Lists

Diffuse Planetary (PNe) Protoplanetary (PPNe) Supernova remnants (SNRs)

Category Category Commons page Commons Wiktionary page Wiktionary

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Stars
Formation

Accretion Molecular cloud Bok globule Young stellar object
Protostar Pre-main-sequence Herbig Ae/Be T Tauri FU Orionis Herbig–Haro object Hayashi track Henyey track

Evolution

Main sequence Red-giant branch Horizontal branch
Red clump Asymptotic giant branch
super-AGB Blue loop Protoplanetary nebula Planetary nebula PG1159 Dredge-up OH/IR Instability strip Luminous blue variable Blue straggler Stellar population Supernova Superluminous supernova / Hypernova

Spectral classification

Early Late Main sequence
O B A F G K M Brown dwarf WR OB Subdwarf
O B Subgiant Giant
Blue Red Yellow Bright giant Supergiant
Blue Red Yellow Hypergiant
Yellow Carbon
S CN CH White dwarf Chemically peculiar
Am Ap/Bp HgMn Helium-weak Barium Extreme helium Lambda Boötis Lead Technetium Be
Shell B[e]

Remnants

White dwarf
Helium planet Black dwarf Neutron
Radio-quiet Pulsar
Binary X-ray Magnetar Stellar black hole X-ray binary
Burster

Hypothetical

Blue dwarf Green Black dwarf Exotic
Boson Electroweak Strange Preon Planck Dark Dark-energy Quark Q Black Gravastar Frozen Quasi-star Thorne–Żytkow object Iron Blitzar

Stellar nucleosynthesis

Deuterium burning Lithium burning Proton–proton chain CNO cycle Helium flash Triple-alpha process Alpha process Carbon burning Neon burning Oxygen burning Silicon burning S-process R-process Fusor Nova
Symbiotic Remnant Luminous red nova

Structure

Core Convection zone
Microturbulence Oscillations Radiation zone Atmosphere
Photosphere Starspot Chromosphere Stellar corona Stellar wind
Bubble Bipolar outflow Accretion disk Asteroseismology
Helioseismology Eddington luminosity Kelvin–Helmholtz mechanism

Properties

Designation Dynamics Effective temperature Luminosity Kinematics Magnetic field Absolute magnitude Mass Metallicity Rotation Starlight Variable Photometric system Color index Hertzsprung–Russell diagram Color–color diagram

Star systems

Binary
Contact Common envelope Eclipsing Symbiotic Multiple Cluster
Open Globular Super Planetary system

Earth-centric
observations

Sun
Solar System Sunlight Pole star Circumpolar Constellation Asterism Magnitude
Apparent Extinction Photographic Radial velocity Proper motion Parallax Photometric-standard

Lists

Proper names
Arabic Chinese Extremes Most massive Highest temperature Lowest temperature Largest volume Smallest volume Brightest
Historical Most luminous Nearest
Nearest bright With exoplanets Brown dwarfs White dwarfs Milky Way novae Supernovae
Candidates Remnants Planetary nebulae Timeline of stellar astronomy

Related articles

Substellar object
Brown dwarf Sub-brown dwarf Planet Galactic year Galaxy Guest Gravity Intergalactic Planet-hosting stars Tidal disruption event

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